2014 Communities

The Nisqually River Council (Olympia, WA)

Nisqually River Council Logowww.nisquallyriver.org

The Nisqually River Council’s (NRC) mission is to create sustainability in the Nisqually Watershed by developing a common culture of environmental, social and economic balance. The Nisqually Watershed, which includes the Nisqually Tribal home and stretches from summit of Mount Rainer to the shores of Puget Sound.

The City of Olympia gets over 80% of its drinking water from the Nisqually Watershed. Because the watershed begins in the glaciers of Mount Rainier, and ends in Puget Sound, the Nisqually is vulnerable to climate change in many ways. In order to accomplish its goals, NRC is committed to preparing an adaptation plan that will allow the watershed to remain healthy and resilient.

Decreasing summer flows from snow and glacier melt systems, and salt water intrusion into their aquifer will make it more difficult for our municipal water suppliers to meet consumer demand. Olympia’s rationale for participating in adaptation planning is based on the following assumptions: Future impacts are inevitable; planned adaptation is cost-effective; choices need to be based on potential future conditions, not the past; natural resources systems will change; and land management decisions that affect the city that are outside its jurisdiction.

 

Tehama County Resource Conservation District (Tehama County, CA)

Tehama-Logowww.tehamacountyrcd.org

In northern California, two neighboring communities will collaborate to develop plans for counties at the headwaters of the Sacramento River. The Mount Shasta Bioregional Ecology Center focuses on conservation, advocacy and education to promote ecological integrity in Mount Shasta’s keystone bioregion. Rising 14,125 ft. above sea level, Mount Shasta contains glaciers and snowpack that naturally stores and delivers headwaters to the mid-Klamath and Sacramento Rivers via surface run-off, spring-fed rivers and underground aquifers. The Tehama County Resource Conservation District has been implementing natural resource management projects in Tehama County for many decades and was named “Organization of the Year” by the Sacramento River Watershed Program in 2011. Their plans will compliment the adaptation plan completed by Western Shasta Resource Conservation District in 2012.

Siskiyou County sits at the headwaters of the Sacramento River, the largest river in California, which travels south through Shasta and Tehama Counties and then continues south to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the San Francisco Bay. The Delta, primarily supplied by the Sacramento and American Rivers, is the West Coast’s largest estuary and provides drinking water for 2/3 of California’s population- approximately 25 million people. Projected climate impacts include hotter and drier conditions, reduced snowpack, and more intense storm/rainfall events which will result in decreased food production, uncertain drinking water supplies, and increased risk of flooding for large populations in the Sacramento and Bay regions.

Together the leadership in both Siskiyou and Tehama Counties will develop their Climate Adaptation Plans in cooperation with downstream urban partners with a focus on ecosystem services provided to downstream urban communities in the Sacramento and San Francisco Bay regions, which includes 1.8 million residents.

 

The Menominee Conservation District (Menominee County, MI)

Menominee-Conservation-District-Logowww.menomineecd.com

The Menominee Conservation District (MCD) works with community members to promote healthy agricultural practices, preserve our soils and waters, and protect Menominee County’s uniquely healthy, diverse ecosystem. MCD will develop an adaptation plan. The MCD board recognized that climate change was starting to affect the county through conversations with the logging and agricultural community.

The Menominee River feeds directly into the Green Bay of Lake Michigan. A chemical company, two paper mills, two municipal wastewater treatment plants, a ship building company, and foundry are located along the river. The frequency of heavy rain in the Great Lakes region has risen approximately 31 percent between 1958 and 2007. Expected increases in flooding along the Menominee River will directly affect Green Bay and Lake Michigan. The city of Green Bay has a large population of families living in poverty- the poverty rate among families with children under 5 years is nearly double the national average.

 

The Red Lake Band of Chippewa (Red Lake, MN)

Red-Lake-Logowww.redlakenation.org

The Red Lake Department of Natural Resources is committed to ensuring quality natural resources on the Red Lake Indian Reservation for the long term benefit of Band members primarily through assessment, research, and management of fisheries, wildlife, waters, wetlands, forests, and the environment. The Band owns in excess of 835,194 acres consisting of approximately 429,000 acres of forest, 240,000 acres of lakes, 466,000 acres of wetlands, and over 371 miles of rivers and streams.

Primary sources of livelihood include hunting, fishing, and subsistence natural resource harvesting. Historically, the two biggest industries have been commercial fishing and logging. Combined, they proved employment for more than 700 Band members and generated income and revenue in excess of $5,000,000 in 1993. These two industries affect every member on the Reservation. Preserving and restoring its rich aquatic ecosystem and abundance of other natural resources is critical to the Band member’s health, welfare, traditional ways of life, economic viability and is a high priority for the Band. The Tribe is wealthy in terms of resources and land, but poor in areas of employment and educational opportunities. The unemployment rate for the Reservation exceeds 60% and the poverty rate is greater than 50%.

 

Mt. Shasta Bioregional Ecology Center (Siskiyou County, CA)

Mount-Shasta-Logowww.mountshastaecology.org

In northern California, two communities will collaborate to develop plans for counties along the upper reaches of the Sacramento River. The Mount Shasta Bioregional Ecology Center focuses on conservation, advocacy and education to promote ecological integrity in Mount Shasta’s keystone bioregion. Rising 14,125 ft. above sea level, Mount Shasta contains glaciers and snowpack that naturally stores and delivers headwaters to the mid-Klamath and Sacramento Rivers via surface run-off, spring-fed rivers and underground aquifers. The Tehama County Resource Conservation District has been implementing natural resource management projects in Tehama County for many decades and was named “Organization of the Year” by the Sacramento River Watershed Program in 2011. Both plans will complement the adaptation plan completed by Western Shasta Resource Conservation District in 2012.

Siskiyou County sits at the headwaters of the Sacramento River, the largest river in California. After meandering through Siskiyou, Shasta and Tehama Counties, the Sacramento River continues south to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, portions of which get diverted and piped to supply farming and municipal stakeholders in Southern California, before emptying into the San Francisco Bay. The Delta, primarily supplied by the Sacramento and American Rivers, is the West Coast’s largest estuary and provides drinking water for 2/3 of California’s population- approximately 25 million people. Projected climate impacts include hotter and drier conditions, reduced snowpack, increased risk of catastrophic forest fire and more intense storm/rainfall events which will result in decreased food production, uncertain drinking water supplies, and increased risk of flooding for large populations in the Sacramento and Bay regions.

Together the leadership in both Siskiyou and Tehama Counties will develop their Climate Adaptation Plans in cooperation with downstream urban partners with a focus on ecosystem services provided to downstream urban communities in the Sacramento and San Francisco Bay regions. Partners include the Sacramento Regional Adaptation Collaborative and Santa Clara Valley Water District, which serves 1.8 million residents.