Outcomes

Our Climate Solutions University Plan Development and Implementation programs are about outcomes. Simply put, communities that work with us achieve RESULTS.

Our programs have served:

  • 72 counties
  • 21 major cities (and many small communities)
  • 2 military bases
  • 10 tribal reservations
  • 17 states

Following are highlights from the many outcomes achieved by local communities served by Climate Solutions University since 2010:

  • Policy, codes and ordinances – at least 6 communities have influenced 7 local and state regulations, including increased protections for streams and riparian areas, water conservation ordinances, and the protection of water resources.
  • Integration of climate adaptation into existing programs – at least 13 communities incorporated climate adaptation into existing plans and programs, such as integration into watershed plans, forest plans, Hazard Mitigation Plans, and transportation plans, as well as increased use of green infrastructure.
  • Conservation & Restoration projects – at least 13 communities restored and/or protected land, natural resources, and ecosystem services, impacting at least 2,535 acres and 60 miles of riparian areas.
  • Volunteers – at least 8 communities have engaged more than 5,000 volunteers in on-the-ground restoration and conservation activities.
  • Funding18+ communities secured more than $4 million in new funds for climate adaptation.
  • Conferences and Symposiums15 communities have hosted 16+ major events focused on local climate adaptation.
  • Fire mitigation – at least 3 communities actively engaged in on-the-ground fire risk reduction for more than 2,000 acres.
  • Communications5 communities have pursued innovative outreach and communications initiatives.

Policy, codes and ordinances – at least 6 communities have influenced 7 local and state regulations, including increased protections for streams and riparian areas, water conservation ordinances, and the protection of water resources.

Integration of climate adaptation into existing programs – at least 13 communities incorporated climate adaptation into existing plans and programs, such as integration into watershed plans, forest plans, HMPs, and transportation plans, as well as increased use of green infrastructure.

Conservation & Restoration projects – at least 13 communities restored and/or protected land, natural resources, and ecosystem services, impacting at least 2,535 acres and 60 miles of riparian areas.

  • The Mountain Studies Institute in Colorado completed forest fuels treatments on 1,300 acres in the San Juan National Forest in partnership with the US Forest Service, restored 110 forest acres to demonstrate biofuel energy as a strategy for restoration, and restored 10 acres of fens.
  • The Superior Watershed Partnership restored more than 120 acres of wetlands and riparian areas on Lakes Superior and Michigan in 2014, and planted with the help of volunteers over 20,000 native pollinator species at Peninsula Point, an important monarch butterfly stopover site.
  • The Southern Oregon Forest Restoration Collaborative implemented mitigation practices on approximately 400 acres of oak habitats on Oregon national forest lands.
  • The City of Bath, Maine placed 140 acres of upland forest critical to water supplies under conservation easement, and implemented forest stewardship resulting in a 10% reduction of sediment delivery; New open space plans in Sagadahoc County, ME will set the stage for thousands of acres of forest connectivity to be preserved and maintain aquifer recharge for the coastal estuary.

Volunteers – at least 8 communities have engaged more than 5,000 volunteers in on-the-ground restoration and conservation activities.

  • The Nisqually River Council in Washington has engaged over 1,000 teachers and students in water quality monitoring, stream flow monitoring, and planting native trees and shrubs in riparian zones
  • The Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association in Washington has engaged more than 3,000 volunteers in salmon habitat restoration, including the restoration of 50 miles of spawning habitat and 100 acres of floodplain.
  • The Superior Watershed Partnership Great Lakes Conservation Corps (GLCC) engaged 268 community volunteers who donated over 2,000 hours of labor.

Funding – 18+ communities secured more than $4 million in new funds for climate adaptation.

  • Western Shasta RCD received a grant for $60,000 from FEMA in 2014 to identify resource needs of northern CA communities regarding flood mitigation, emergency preparedness, and climate adaptation.
  • The Mountain Studies Institute received $160K in 2016 from the US Forest Service for forest restoration work and the development of monitoring protocols, and also received $7,500 from local water conservation districts to address treatment of forests in order to protect water supplies.
  • Since 2013, the Superior Watershed Partnership has raised over $1.2 million for their climate adaptation work including control of invasive species at critical habitat for piping plover and monarch butterfly; stream restoration projects including fish passage/habitat improvements, road crossing replacement, and erosion/sediment control; and reduction of non-point source pollution and improve water quality in two watersheds and the nearshore waters of Lake Superior.
  • The Southern Oregon Forest Restoration Collaborative secured various grants over $250,000 for climate-smart restoration planning and practices for forest landscapes in the Rogue Basin during the first year of implementing their adaptation plan.
  • A group of Norton Sound Native Villages in Alaska raised more than $400,000 to support climate adaptation planning and training for native villages in the Seward Peninsula/ Norton Sound region.

Conferences and Symposium – 15 communities have hosted 16+ major events focused on local climate adaptation.

Fire mitigation – at least 3 communities actively engaged in on-the-ground fire risk reduction for more than 2,000 acres.

Communications – 5 communities have pursued innovative outreach and communications initiatives.

Other

  • The Superior Watershed Partnership in partnership with Applied Ecological Services, 906 Technologies, Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, and NOAA, developed  and launched the Great Lakes Shoreviewer, a coastal planning and climate adaptation tool included in the US Climate Tool Kit.

 

Watch the videos below to see what communities accomplished through our 2016 Climate Solutions Implementation Project!

Sierra Business Council, CA

Norton Bay, AK

Mountain Studies Institute, CO

Nisqually River Council, WA

Southern Oregon Forest Restoration Collaborative, OR

Canyon Lands Watershed Council, UT

Sustainable Sandhills, NC